2014 Porsche 911 Turbo and Turbo S: Ms. Stuttgart Has Arrived [Video and Photos]

The 40th anniversary Porsche 911 Turbo, aka Ms. Stuttgart 2014, has arrived, and judging by those rear fenders, she has some junk in the trunk… a 3.8 liter, twin-turbo flat-six to be precise.  She may look a lot like the past several Ms. Stuttgarts, but don’t be fooled the 2014 911 Turbo and Turbo S bring a lot to the table.

Let start with that 3.8 liter flat-six, shall we.  In the… ahem… standard 911 Turbo, that particular powerplant puts out an impressive 520 horsepowers (20 more than the 997 Turbo) and 479 pound-feet of torque, good enough to propel the über Beetle from 0-60 mph in 3.2 seconds.  Not too shabby.  Not earth-shattering, but definitely quick.  Tweak it and toss it into the hind end of the 2014 911 Turbo S and you’ll have a car producing 560 horse (30 more than the 997 Turbo) and 516 pound-feet that’ll launch you to sixty in a hold-on-is-this-watch-right 2.9 seconds.  

The Turbo will top out at an electronically limited 196 mph; the Turbo S at 198 mph.  Any faster and the tires may burst.  Don’t expect to try and recreate those numbers with a manual gearbox, because there isn’t one.  The 991 Turbo and Turbo S are only offered with Porsche’s 7-speed PDK dual-clutch gearbox.  It’s a sad day when the best 911s, the Turbo and GT3, don’t get a stick-shift option.  It’s the end of an era, folks.  However, with the PDK working in conjunction with a new thermal management system and auto stop/start, the 2014 is the most fuel efficient 911 Turbo, ever.

Having that much power and boasting that much speed means you need some serious help in the aerodynamics department.  Traction is key, you see.  Thankfully, both of the 2014 Porsche 911 Turbos create plenty of downforce thanks to a three-stage automatic rear wing and three-stage pneumatically extending front spoiler.  According to Porsche, in full attack mode, the Turbo’s wing & spoiler will shave up to two seconds off of it’s Nürburgring North Loop lap time.  Good gravy.

Add to that a new all-wheel-drive system complete with rear-wheel steering (with up to 2.8 degrees of steering), Porsche Traction Management and multi-plate coupling and you have a car that will seriously attack the corners and leave them begging for their lives.  I’ll let Porsche explain how their rear-wheel steering works:

“The steering angle of the rear wheels can be varied by up to 2.8 degrees, depending on vehicle speed. At speeds up to 31 mph, when the front wheels are turned, the system steers the rear wheels in the opposite direction. This actually corresponds to a virtual shortening of the wheelbase by 9.8 inches, which gives the 911 Turbo unrivalled performance in curves. The system lets the car turn faster into corners and offers more dynamic steering response. This noticeably simplifies maneuvering and parking.

“At speeds above 50 mph, the system steers the rear wheels parallel to the front wheels. This is equivalent to a virtual lengthening of the wheelbase by 19.6 inches and gives the car tremendous directional control capability. At the same time, the steering input by the driver leads to significantly faster build-up of lateral force at the rear axle, which responds to steering commands even more quickly.”

Porsche claims that the 2014 911 Turbo S will tackle the Nürburgring Nordschleife in “well under 7 and a half minutes — with standard production tires”.  That puts it tantalizingly close to the 7:25 achieved by the Carrera GT.  This may be the fastest track Porsche yet.

Let’s talk about stopping.  Standard brakes are 15 inch disks all around.  Step up to the optional brakes and you get 16.1 inch ceramic brakes up front and 15.4 inch out back.  The Turbo gets four-piston monoblock calipers and the Turbo S gets six-piston.

The 991 Turbo is wide.  Very, very wide.  Some may say too wide.  The 991 Carrera 4 is 1.7 inches wider than the base 911.  The Turbo is another 1.1 inches on top of that, making it 73.9 inches wide.  To give you some reference, a Range Rover Sport is 76.1 inches wide.  Like I said, wide.  It’s width may actually detract from some of its everyday usability, especially in particularly tight parking lots.

The 991 Turbo looks a lot like the 997 Turbo and the 996 before it.  The subtle styling changes that separate the 991 from the 997 carry through in the Turbo with the Turbo S getting its own pair of LED headlights.  Both cars run on 20 inch wheels shod in sticky tires, 45/35ZR20 in the front and 305/30ZR20 at the rear.  The interior is new.  You get optional toys like 18-way adjustable sport seats with memory, a Burmester sound system, radar-controlled cruise control, camera-based road sign recognition and speed limit recognition.  Speed limit recognition could be really useful, or, if you don’t care about speed limits and are like most Porsche Turbo owners, really annoying.

The 2014 Porsche 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S will hit dealerships sometime near the end of the year.  They will also carry a very, very heavy price tag.  The 2014 911 Turbo starts at a lofty $149,250 including the $950 destination charge.  The 2014 911 Turbo S starts at a stratospheric $182,050 with the $950 destination charge.  

Porsche 911s, Turbos included, have never really stirred my soul or inspired me like other cars.  I don’t really understand the fanaticism surrounding them.  I’d prefer a Nissan GTR, Aston Martin Vantage, Chevy Corvette Stingray PLUS an Audi RS6, Lotus Exige PLUS a BMW M5, or a Lamborghini Gallardo.  That being said, I have no doubt that this car will be a blast to drive and a beast on the track.  Porsche is very, very good at making the 911.  For all the rest of the details, check out Porsche’s press release below the gallery.

Press Release

Porsche 911 Turbo Press Release

Atlanta. The Porsche model offensive in the anniversary year of the 911 is reaching new heights. Fifty years ago, the 911 made its debut at the Frankfurt International Auto Show – and just ten years later, the first 911 Turbo prototype was at the IAA. On this 40th anniversary of the 911 Turbo, Porsche is now presenting the new generation 911 Turbo and Turbo S – the technological and dynamic performance peak of the 911 series. A new all-wheel-drive system, active rear axle steering, adaptive aerodynamics, full-LED headlights, and up to 560 hp from a flat six-cylinder engine with twin-turbochargers underscore the role of the new generation 911 Turbo as an ultra performance car, every day car, and technology flagship. Playing an equally crucial role are an entirely new chassis and lightweight design with a 3.9-inch longer wheelbase and larger 20-inch wheels. The Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC) active anti-roll system, which is being offered for the first time in 911 Turbo models, increases dynamic performance even more. This system is standard equipment in the 911 Turbo S, as is Sport Chrono Package Plus with dynamic engine mounts, and Porsche Carbon Ceramic Composite Brakes (PCCB); all of these features are also available as options in the 911 Turbo. The result: The new 911 Turbo S shortens the lap time for the North Loop of the Nurburgring to well under 7 and a half minutes – with standard production tires. Improved Performance and Efficiency The new engine and refined PDK transmission is partnered with a new Porsche Traction Management (PTM) all-wheel drive system. The turbocharged 3.8-liter six-cylinder engine with direct fuel injection produces 520 hp in the 911 Turbo and 560 hp in the S model. Porsche continues to be the only carmaker to offer two turbochargers with variable turbine geometry on a gasoline engine. Power is transferred to the drivetrain via a seven-speed dual clutch transmission (PDK), which now enables an auto start/stop function with engine shutoff, which activates earlier while the car is coming to a stop as well as when coasting at speed. A new combined thermal management system for the turbo engine and the PDK transmission are projected to result in real world fuel economy improvements when final U.S. EPA label values are calculated closer to the time the car is on sale in the United States. Induction and engine sounds are transmitted to the passenger compartment via a speaker diaphragm. New all-wheel drive with electro-hydraulic control For even faster and more precise power distribution to the front and rear axles, Porsche developed a new PTM all-wheel drive system with electronically controlled and activated multi-plate coupling. The system is equipped with a new water cooling function, which allows for more strength, and therefore more drive torque to the front wheels, than the system in the previous 911 Turbo. Simultaneously, the optimized interplay of the engine, transmission and all-wheel drive systems results in significant improvements to the acceleration capabilities of the 911 Turbo and Turbo S. The 911 Turbo with the optional Sport Chrono Package Plus accelerates from zero to 60 mph in 3.2 seconds, on its way to a top track speed of 196 mph. The 911 Turbo S handles the sprint to 60 mph in just 2.9 seconds, with a top track speed of 198 mph. Widest body of all 911 cars Visually, the two new top variants of the 911 lineup are set apart from other models more than ever. The characteristic expansively wide rear body panels of the new generation 911 Turbo are a further 1.1 inches wider than on the 911 Carrera 4- the fenders feature a nearly level surface, about the width of a hand, between the C-pillar and the outer edge of the car body. Other differentiating characteristics include forged two-tone 20-inch aluminum wheels. On the 911 Turbo S they have center hub wheel locks. The Turbo S is further differentiated by new, standard full-LED headlights that feature four-point daytime running lights and camera-based high/low beam control, which can be ordered as an option for the 911 Turbo. Rear wheel steering notably enhances responsiveness The introduction of rear wheel steering in all turbo models immensely improves both track driving capability and everyday performance of the two new sports cars. The system consists of two electro-mechanical actuators, instead of the conventional control links, on the left and right rear axles. The steering angle of the rear wheels can be varied by up to 2.8 degrees, depending on vehicle speed. At speeds up to 31 mph, when the front wheels are turned, the system steers the rear wheels in the opposite direction. This actually corresponds to a virtual shortening of the wheelbase by 9.8 inches, which gives the 911 Turbo unrivalled performance in curves. The system lets the car turn faster into corners and offers more dynamic steering response. This noticeably simplifies maneuvering and parking. At speeds above 50 mph, the system steers the rear wheels parallel to the front wheels. This is equivalent to a virtual lengthening of the wheelbase by 19.6 inches and gives the car tremendous directional control capability. At the same time, the steering input by the driver leads to significantly faster build-up of lateral force at the rear axle, which responds to steering commands even more quickly. Active aerodynamics improve efficiency and performance Porsche developed an active aerodynamic system on the new 911 Turbo models for the first time. It consists of a retractable three-stage front spoiler, whose segments can be pneumatically extended, and a deployable rear wing with three adjustable wing positions. This makes it possible to tune the aerodynamics of the 911 Turbo to fulfill driver wishes for either optimal efficiency or top dynamic performance. In the performance position, all segments of the front spoiler are fully extended, and they generate considerable down force at the front axle. Similarly, the rear wing is extended to its maximum height with the greatest angle of attack. This also generates more down force at the rear axle. Dynamic performance is improved to such an extent that lap times at the North Loop of the Nurburgring are improved by up to two seconds due to this system alone. New interior with high-end features The interior was completely redesigned in both 911 Turbo models, and it builds on the 911 Carrera family. The S model is particularly well equipped, offering such features as an exclusive interior in a black/Carrera red color combination and standard Sport Seats Plus with 18-way adjustment and memory. In addition, the seat back shells are upholstered in leather with double cap seams and various elements in carbon look. As on the previous models, the Bose® sound system is installed as standard; for the first time, a Burmester® system is also available as an optional feature. A radar-controlled cruise control system, camera-based road sign recognition, and speed limit recognition are other new options being offered. The new top models of the 911 model series arrive on the market at the end of 2013 in the United States. The 911 Turbo is priced from $148,300 while the 911 Turbo S begins at $181,100, not including a destination charge of $950.

 

Author: Nick Glasnovich

Founder & Executive Editor of TickTickVroom.com.

Share This Post On

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *